Osteoporosis

Our bones are living tissue that give our body structure, allow us to move and protect our organs. Osteoporosis is a condition where bones become thin and  lose their strength. This can lead to fractures, which cause pain and make everyday activities extremely difficult. After a hip fracture, about one-quarter of people die or never walk again. 

It’s estimated over 200 million women have osteoporosis. That’s more than the combined populations of the Germany, the United Kingdom and France.

Worldwide, one in three women and one in five men over the age of fifty will experience an osteoporotic fracture.

In fact, every three seconds a bone will break, somewhere in the world, because of this disease.

Many people won’t know they have osteoporosis until their first fracture, which is why it’s called the ‘silent disease’. Even after a break, it often goes untreated.

The good news is osteoporosis can be diagnosed and treated and fractures often prevented through healthy lifestyle choices and appropriate medication for those in need.
 

Our Bone Health Advocates

Her Majesty Queen Rania

Although we have effective treatments for osteoporosis, each year millions of our grandmothers are crippled and disfigured because they don't have easy and sufficient access to diagnosis and medication. Osteoporosis has become a large global, social and medical movement. The women who have cared for us now need us to care enough to urge policy-makers to give them access to proven therapies before they break a bone. Today, I join with women across the world to call for an end to this unnecessary suffering.

Philipe Chevrier, master chef

My philosophy is to cook food that is balanced and healthy, using seasonal ingredients. I’m interested in osteoporosis because it affects one woman in three and one man in five (over the age of 50). There is a link between osteoporosis and nutrition because food that is rich in calcium and vitamin D can strengthen the bones. Bone Appétit.

René Rizzoli, IOF Treasurer and CSA Vice-Chair

IOF's scientific members carry out a broad range of research projects, participate in educational programs and provide valuable support to the patient movement.