Osteoporosis

Our bones are living tissue that give our body structure, allow us to move and protect our organs. Osteoporosis is a condition where bones become thin and  lose their strength. This can lead to fractures, which cause pain and make everyday activities extremely difficult. After a hip fracture, about one-quarter of people die or never walk again. 

It’s estimated over 200 million women have osteoporosis. That’s more than the combined populations of the Germany, the United Kingdom and France.

Worldwide, one in three women and one in five men over the age of fifty will experience an osteoporotic fracture.

In fact, every three seconds a bone will break, somewhere in the world, because of this disease.

Many people won’t know they have osteoporosis until their first fracture, which is why it’s called the ‘silent disease’. Even after a break, it often goes untreated.

The good news is osteoporosis can be diagnosed and treated and fractures often prevented through healthy lifestyle choices and appropriate medication for those in need.
 

Our Bone Health Advocates

Joanna Lumley, Supporter of the National Osteoporosis Society, UK

In the UK alone, every three minutes someone breaks a bone because of osteoporosis and we know that unless we take action now, the number of cases will keep rising. I hope that as many people as possible take the one-minute osteoporosis test, so we're all aware of the risk factors that we face.

Dame Ellen MacArthur, solo long-distance yachtswoman

People thought I took a big risk when I sailed around the world by myself. However, there's one thing I don't take risks with, and that's my bone health, because without strong bones I wouldn't have been able to sail across so many seas. I'm not going to take any risks with my bones, and neither should you. Get yourself checked and beat the break, so you can continue doing what you like best.

Joan Rivers, comedienne

Never in my wildest dreams did I think I would be a candidate for osteoporosis. I know now, I should have paid more attention to my personal risk factors; I should have taken better care of my bones. You know what? So should you. So come on, Beat the Break, take responsibility for your bones. Just talk to your doctor about osteoporosis.